There are many good descriptions of leadership out there. I like this one from Simon Sinek:

“Leadership requires two things: a vision of the world that does not yet exist and the ability to communicate it.”

I like it because it distills the essence of what it is to be a leader. I would add a third element to his description to make it more complete and that is:

…the ability to get people to do things they would not otherwise do.

General Ann Dunwoody served 37 years in the U.S. Army. She was the first woman in U.S. Military history to achieve a four-star officer rank. She’s now joined the board of Automattic. In an interview with Matt Mullenweg, she shared some insights on global leadership.

I loved what she had to say on leadership:

Matt: We’re excited to have you onboard, General Dunwoody. It’s interesting — at Automattic we like to point out that we’re all over the globe (over 740 employees in more than 60 countries) but you oversaw 69,000 military and civilians across 140 countries! Were there any big leadership lessons from managing operations across such a wide range of distances, timezones, and cultures?

Gen. Dunwoody: That’s a great question. When I started out as a young officer in the Army, the leadership philosophy that was espoused back then was “Leadership by walking around.” When you’re in charge of a platoon, a company or even a battalion or Brigade that is not globally dispersed this philosophy is very sound. When you’re running a global organization with 69,000 folks in 140 countries, you have to leverage technology to keep real-time communications flowing and keep leaders updated. I would host (with the leadership) a global video teleconference every Wednesday connecting every organization from Afghanistan, Kuwait, Iraq, Europe, etc. and sites — hundreds across the United States. Our headquarters would provide an operational update and then we go around the globe to get update from everyone — what’s going well, where they need help or additional resources. In the old days I think people believed information was power and often withheld information to use for personal advantage, but I believe shared information is power. By leveraging the power of the entire industrial base we could solve problems in real time. I still travelled around a lot to see our people, but it is not possible to keep everyone informed and in the loop with current operations without leveraging technology.

You can read the full here.